Atu: The Magus

Lunar Intention: Union

Location: 15.6631° N, 73.7419° E (Mandrem Beach, Goa, India)

On the road again. The travelling life is a familiar and comfortable one, a flow state that I easily slip into. There’s a certain awareness and disposition that comes with this state: an embodied sense that surfaces at the start of any new journey.

Although I’ve always lived in Melbourne, and a ten-kilometre circle in Melbourne’s inner northern suburbs at that, frequent travel has been a recurring theme in my adult life. I have travelled to lose myself, find myself and re-invent myself; I have travelled for love, marriage and to escape unhappy relationships; I have travelled for birthdays and I have travelled for deaths; I have travelled for family, with family and to symbolically let go of a dead family member; I have travelled on a whim and because I couldn’t think of anything better to do with my life. I have consistently travelled to avoid my adult responsibilities in life but I have also travelled to leverage growth and change, because of spiritual inspiration or just because I thought it would make a good story later. Relevant to this blog, I have travelled to re-enchant my life whenever it feels bogged down in orthodoxy, monotony and order. Travel for me is the best counter spell to the curse of Greyface.

As a means of re-enchantment, travelling drops me into a state of deep experiencing that is marked from the numbed trance of my domestic life. The greatest tool of re-enchantment is being able to adopt the role of flâneur and cultivating the state of meditative contemplation that comes with a flâneur’s lifestyle.

Travelling re-enchants because it sharpens one’s psychic and somatic awareness. I am conscious of my being moving through new and unfamiliar environments; I carry an awareness of how my clothes hang on me, how new climates affect me and a material sense of the contents of my pockets and bags. I notice more the effects of food and my interactions with strangers. My sense of personal safety and responsibility is piqued; my curiosity about everything that goes on around me, insatiable. Travel tests my resilience and resourcefulness through a range of material and emotional discomforts. This method of re-enchanting allows me a greater sense of the limits of my personal boundaries, limits I am often not challenged to explore to any depth in the humdrum of life back home. Crucially, travel gets my creative juices flowing. The link between walking and creativity has been well documented and I find that the flâneur lifestyle agrees with this. I can happily walk for miles a day when travelling and my journal entries become essay length on all manner of topics.

Travel is my life for the next 18 months. I can barely comprehend this length of time and who I will be by the end. It has been 5 years in the making, as it took me some time before I could leave. I had to overcome a number of (material and psychological) financial obstacles, I ended one relationship and started a new one and I went on several shorter journeys in the intervening time. As the trip’s gestation period has been so long, the original motivation for this trip doesn’t exist anymore. When I first started planning this trip I wanted, in part, an avenue to avoid having to settle down but also a means to try and massively re-enchant my life through extended wandering. The nuclear option of re-enchantment through travel! Generally after a big trip I can maintain that heightened state of aliveness for anywhere up to 3 months. My hope was that by going nuclear I could make it more or less permanent or acquire the tools and resources to help me do so. The thing is my need to escape and re-enchant my life is not as strong now as it was 5 years ago. It has been an ongoing and well-integrated process for several years. Re-enchantment is not something I find somewhere else, but a continual conversation in the here and now. Furthermore, the travelling life is nice, but I’m at an age in my life where I coo over babies and daydream about what it would be like to own a house in the bush and know my grandchildren. I have transitioned to a more mature phase of life that doesn’t crave or revolve around constant escape and adventure.

So I am on the road again and in the curious position of having lost the original motivation to go on the road in the first place. I’m also well past the point where I have any interest in following well-worn tourist trails and tick-a-box travelling, if I ever really did (I wrote about this exact thing many years ago in my essay Khosanitis). I leave behind an amazing life in Melbourne and have little need for the nuclear option; the integration of my personal and magickal lives has taken many years but these days they are synonymous. Adding to all this is the deeply felt sense that when I return my life will be radically different. I will be living in the country, babies will be a thing and so will a new career that doesn’t involve a 9-5 grind. Effectively, this trip marks a distinct separation between two phases of my life. I think we all experience these moments. Most change occurs incrementally but sometimes events and circumstance dramatically pull down the curtains, leaving us in no doubt that one act has ended and another is about to begin. This is my current reality. I am enjoying something of an intermission between acts, but an intermission that’s still a feature of the whole play and one which will determine what happens in the next act. I feel that this intermission and the absence of a need to travel for any other reason than for itself gives me immense freedom to create something new and lasting from this journey.

I like this freedom. It’s not the freedom of running away to solve a problem or the freedom of desperately trying to re-enchant a life that has gone stale. Which is freedom ‘from’. Now I have freedom ‘to’: the freedom to be, to create and to dive as fucking deep as I can. Antero Alli says that to fly we need to have both feet on the ground. With my feet firmly planted I can obtain great heights but also greater depths. Apart from a vague arrow on a map, I have no real idea of where I’m going, but I do know that with every step the ground beneath my feet becomes illuminated. The world is a massive place but at least I can see where I stand.


Paying death’s wages

A while back, I posted about how a couple of encounters with my own mortality had served as deeply personal initiatory experiences. The post garnered a lot of feedback from a range of people, both online and in person, which took me completely by surprise. What surprised me even more was the disparity in the tone and flavour of the feedback I received. Most people seemed to get the post and gave supporting comments about me showing vulnerability and insight, which was nice (flattery will get you far); more than a few, however, seemed to miss the point entirely and I was flooded with messages along the lines of ‘get well soon’ or ‘I hope your results are in the clear’. This confused the hell out of me and led me to wonder if I had communicated my experiences with a lack of clarity.

My intention in writing the piece was not to garner sympathy but to attempt a personal meditation on a recent cancer scare and show how encounters with illness and death can lead us into deeper states of being. Yet, sympathy I received in abundance.

After mulling it over and speaking to several close friends I came to several conclusions about why my post wasn’t received as I’d intended:

  • I’d failed to communicate the story as effectively as I could and therefore people had drawn the wrong conclusion (however, this doesn’t explain why many people did get what I was writing about)
  • It was published on Facebook and nobody actually reads anything on Facebook, not being the greatest medium for nuanced communication
  • The piece had cancer as subject matter and some readers were too triggered to actually absorb the contents. As a friend said to me: “people lose their shit when cancer is involved”
  • Some readers just didn’t want to know about it, for the same reason that they don’t seek out initiatory experiences or encounters with death in their own lives

I don’t claim to know which of these is the correct answer or even if there is a correct answer, but I do think the last couple of these raises some interesting issues.

Writing a meditation on illness and death is a little against the grain for the way in which our culture tells us to direct our attention. People don’t want to know about death. It’s saved for the end of life when, having been staved off for so long, it makes its presence known with interest. I suspect also that people aren’t interested in discussions of illness or death because they would then have to contemplate their own deaths. It’s that superstitious mindset that says if you don’t think about or mention a thing then it may never happen. And if you contemplate your death than you really need to start contemplating the meaning of your own individual life.

As Stephen Jenkinson writes, we live in a death-phobic society. However, in order to fully live, we need to pay the wages of death. It’s an interesting, gnomic turn of phrase and I think it’s absolutely spot on.

We must pay death’s wages by carrying death in our pocket through our entire lives. Death is present from the moment we are born, from the second of our first inhalation, the imbued, deeply embodied knowledge that life is preciously finite and infinitely precious. Initiation, a different kind of birth, wakes us up to this: welcome to life; one day you will die.

Initiation shows us that death is the price we pay for being alive in this world. Death is the final word; without it our lives have no meaning. In mathematical terms, a life is a set that is composed of all its elements. Any contemplation of life in its entirety must include its own death as an element. We can ignore death but we cannot exclude it. We cannot forestall it. Death doesn’t make deals and it exacts its due eventually. The problem is that generally we can’t afford to pay in a lump sum at the end; the price is too high, the suffering too great, and then we do anything to avoid going gentle into that good night. By honouring death, the little death present in every single moment as it bursts into existence and vanishes into the past, we give meaning to life. Death must receive the acknowledgement that it’s due. When we carry death at our side our lives are deeper, richer, more purposeful.

Furthermore, we must leave room for death’s voice in our lives not just for ourselves but for those we know and love. To love someone is also to carry the weight of their death. When my mum died five years ago, my dad and I took quite divergent paths to how we processed our grief. My route was to try and ‘let go of it’, as if the grief was something that needed to be processed and resolved. In contrast, my dad had my mum’s ashes interred in a metal box (painted in Collingwood colours, no less), which he placed in a part of the garden surrounded by wombat figurines, a totemic animal for her. Even to this day he sits out there and talks to her as he has his morning cigarette. My brother and I worried at first that his inability to ‘let go’ or move on was unhealthy. It took me some time to realise that the opposite was true; that my desire to move on was the unhealthy desire whereas my dad’s was perfectly natural. It is the duty of the living to bear the dead. We need to retain that kernel of grief in our hearts to keep the dead alive, to remind us of the imprint they have left upon us, in our hearts and souls. That grief reminds us that we in turn will be grieved and begs the question of how we would like to be grieved.

Even though I had begun practising ancestral rituals at the time I was blind to this truth and it took me a long while to realise it. In fact, it was only upon looking my own death in the face did I fully understand my obligations to those ancestors who have died. This knowledge took my ancestral practise to greater depths than I could have even realised without it.

Before departing overseas I had the pleasure of writing up my own death plan. It was an interesting experience contemplating how I wanted to be remembered by my family and friends and my hope that my personal values, what I stood for in life, would be honoured. I’d like my death to be a celebration of my life: music, poetry and dancing are mandatory. I would like my ashes scattered along the Black Spur in Healesville and I want a Thelemic ritual. Yet, such is the taboo of discussing death in my life that I felt awkward telling me siblings that I had done so. Though it was received as I’d hoped, it was that case again of not wanting to name a thing unless it happened. I suggested to my dad that I do his death plan too.

“What do I care, I’ll be dead,” he responded.

“Okay then, we’ll play the Carlton Football Club theme song at your funeral.”

No you will not!

“So you do care what happens at your funeral,” I replied, laying down my trump card.

And we do care, as much as we try and avoid thinking about it. This is how we pay death’s wages; contemplating the legacy we leave behind us and for future generations. Death will eventually be paid. We can pay it in instalments or in a lump sum and this choice informs the depth and meaning in our lives.

Before I end this post, I want to clarify as emphatically as I can that I do NOT have leukaemia. I have precursor cells to leukaemia in the same way that a mole is a precursor to a melanoma. And a very mild form of leukaemia at that: so mild I probably wouldn’t even notice that I had it. The likelihood that it will develop into anything is 10-15% so that’s 85-90% that it won’t. Given that there is a 30% chance the average person will develop cancer at some point in their life, I’m already winning. Also, I maintain a very healthy lifestyle, so knock those odds down a few percentage points and I’m winning even more. I’m fit, healthy and have a deeply rich life.

At the same time there is a great unknown attached to all of this. Leukaemia is a scary concept to contemplate no matter how benign. A course of immunotherapy isn’t exactly a holiday, so there is a sense of some Damoclean sword hanging above me. But here is the crux: I am incredibly grateful for this. I am grateful for these experiences that remind me of my own mortality, of the fragility and ephemerality of life, because they also make me appreciate the preciousness of life. Without seeing my life flash before my eyes in a Balinese hospital or contemplating my own mortality in the Bardo that is waiting for an appointment with a cancer specialist, I would still be skimming on the surface of life without recourse to contemplate my own death. These experiences remind me I only have one shot and drive me to live more deeply. I want to carpe the fuck out of that diem.

But even in the midst of a deeply rich life death must be paid. One day my life will end. It is this death and the grace in which I depart that will provide my life with its ultimate meaning.


Ten points for an eight-pointed game

Atu: The Fool

Lunar Intention: Decompression

Location: 8.74° N, 76.72° E (Varkala, India)

  1. The fundamental rule is that there are no rules, rules serving to constrict the creative expansion and flow necessary for play. Everything else is a guide towards creative expression.
  2. To truly meet a place, feet must kiss soil as one would kiss a lover
  3. Not all those who wander are lost but it’s more fun if they are
  4. Experience always demands some form of opening in response
  5. Discomfort is a necessary comfort
  6. Propitiate the local gods and divine the spirit of a location
  7. Breath and skin are the only avenues home, but you won’t arrive unless you travel both at the same time
  8. Dream pieces can be brought back to create puzzles
  9. The sacred exists in everything but especially within the profane
  10. Interpret all phenomenon as if they were the manifestation of the divine (according to one’s own interpretation of it) into one’s life




Radical presence

Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold- Yeats

My life has been hectic these past three months! In a little over a fortnight I will board a plane overseas and begin an 18-month global pilgrimage, so my days, not to mention quite a few restless nights, have become a logistical frenzy. Moving my possessions into storage, tying up loose ends, sorting finances and working out budgets, updating addresses, obtaining visas and vaccinations; buying gear, saying farewells to family and friends and shifting between different housesits every second week. As soon as we unload the car and put down some tentative roots in a strange new abode, we’re cleaning up after ourselves, reloading the car, saying our goodbyes and moving on to the next place. All the while I’ve been working a full-time job, planning a workshop, running a counselling business and performing the odd shiatsu here and there. As a consequence, my creative outlets have dried to a trickle, I’ve barely engaged in any ritual practises (and when I do I’m usually too tired to do so with any kind of depth) and I carry a strange, disembodied feeling of having drifted away from my own centre and the state of being present that comes with it. So much so, in fact, that it feels like the work right now is just learning how to become centred and present again. I say this by way of explanation, not apology- I am completely responsible for myself and for letting things slide in this fashion.

However, I was complaining about the effects of the constant moving and planning to my teacher, Arion—more by way of apology than explanation—and he said something in response that struck me:

“But this is just an excuse for not showing up. It’s only the surface personality that says it’s affected. Do you think that the constant moving around changes who you are underneath- there is an eternal underlying you whose identity doesn’t depend on always being in the same place. You don’t have to be in the same house all the time to be present as yourself.”

He was right of course, but it led me to wonder how I’d managed to let things slip so easily and why my ability to remain present and centred was so brittle in the face of ephemeral circumstance.

Even if we are not overtly conscious of it, we intuitively understand that there’s a deeper level of self, which is eternal and unchanging, the true ‘I’ in the personality’s whirling storm. As David Abram so eloquently puts it:

…the life-world has various layers, that underneath the layer of the diverse cultural life-worlds there reposes a deeper, more unitary life-world, always already there beneath all our cultural acquisitions, a vast and continually overlooked dimension of experience that nevertheless supports and sustains all our diverse and discontinuous worldviews

A huge part of my work the past twelve months has been learning how to cultivate more of this ‘I’ in myself, bringing its steady presence to the fore so that I am buffeted less by the winds of mood and event. I’m not talking about being mentally in the present, as is so popular in the mindfulness movement, although that’s one aspect of it. What I refer to is a radical presence: a total, integration of my perceptual, sensory, emotional and rational faculties in this very instant and complete congruence in my resulting action. Or a radically heightened state of awareness and aliveness in my being. Yes it’s a mouthful. I’ll leave it to David Abram again to say it more poetically and succinctly than I:

[Presence] must still, as it were, be woven into the present, an activity that necessarily involves both a receptivity to the specific shapes and textures of that present and a spontaneous creativity in adjusting oneself…to those contours. It is this open activity, this dynamic blend of receptivity and creativity by which every animate organism orients itself to the world.

Through cultivating radical presence I open myself fully to my immediate experience and allow myself to act spontaneously in response, without being laden by the baggage of premeditation, conditioning, fear or sheer incongruence between my various and different faculties. And if there is incongruence between those faculties—when my skin says yes and my heart says no, for example—then I am aware and alive to this incongruence. I do not push it aside but claim it as my own, as part of me. Because it is.

Arion gives the metaphor of how people go through life with the intensity throttled at 15%. Most aren’t even aware that they are at 15% intensity or that their lived experience is so diminished. Through radical presence, the aim is to cultivate 100%.

At times it’s felt like hard work. And how tenuous my success if I can be so easily knocked from my centre through distraction and logistical overload!

I find it curious that becoming present could be hard work.

I also consider it one of the great tragedies of modern life that we are only granted one shot at existence but spend our time pursuing myriad ways avoiding showing up and being present in the world. We prize the mind at the expense of the body, numb ourselves with alcohol, television and banality and have stunted our sexuality. We’ve lost the ability to move our bodies with creative and flowing expression and the art of being present is not taught let alone understood. As a consequence we are thrown off our individual centres of being. I recognise when this happens in myself; my personal centre is somewhere outside of me and with that comes a dissociated feeling. There is deep incongruence in my response to events and often my response is calculated (sometimes consciously and sometimes not) to avoid true awareness and to nullify or take the pressure off aliveness.

Children do not seem to have this problem but there appears to be something that happens in our childhood or early teenage years that tells us that desensitizing ourselves to the intensity of life is the safest option, that to fully feel the world, to fully inhabit ourselves is a terrifying and overwhelming experience to be avoided. And so we turn life’s volume down.

My job as a counsellor and shiatsu therapist is that of a trail guide leading people back to their aliveness, through developing awareness and physicality. We inhabit bodies in space that breathe, feel, emote, think and speak. The work—and the art—is learning how to balance these essences so that they are fully integrated in each single moment. I help people cultivate presence. And if I want to be a good guide I must know which paths to travel; hence my commitment to cultivating radical presence. There also seems to be something quite healing about being present for the benefit of others. My homie, Carl Rogers, had a lot to say about presence:

I find that when I am the closest to my inner, intuitive self –when perhaps I am somehow in touch with the unknown in me…At those moments, it seems that my inner spirit has reached out and touched the inner spirit of the other. Our relationship transcends itself, and has become part of something larger. Profound growth and healing are present

Most of my healing has been in this regard; I used to be the least present person in the room. I’m sure we’ve all met those people who are noticeable by their absence. That was once me, so I know those paths well. But radical presence goes beyond even Rogers’ admittedly mild definition. Radical presence is a commitment to showing up not just in an hour of therapy but in moment after moment every day for the rest of our lives. It’s turning up the volume of that throttle again, opening oneself up to greater levels of being and intensity ad finitum. We will never reach 100% intensity and nor should ever hope to. Where could we go from there?


Bur still, we must press on…

I’m not surprised that I so easily lost my centre. I’ve been programmed and culturally conditioned to avoid it at all costs and play a role where it’s easier to numb out than dive deep. And to be honest, moving around every week, having to continually reprogram my body to different routines and sleep schedules while taking on a metric fuck-tonne of other work is not the most enjoyable experience. It’s stressful, draining and unpleasant. But that’s not the point. The point is that I show up to all experience. Life is not a take-it-or-leave it kind of deal. You’re all in or you’re not. By dissociating away from the stress and allowing myself to be swept away from my centre, I am relinquishing control of my own experience and muting out parts of my life. Life is made for aliveness, as trite as that sounds. Yes there are experiences in life where it is safer to turn the volume down or mute out but even these must be felt and integrated at some stage (read The Body Keeps the Score for more on this). But the muting should not be a default setting. And a couple of months of hectic planning before an extended (and what will be an undeniably awesome) overseas trip is not really in the ballpark of unpleasant experiences to be toned down. It’s just a conditioned response.

In telling a friend about my experience, she reflected that it sounded like I’d been going through an initiation. I hadn’t considered it in that way before, but I totally agree with her. And every initiation requires that we be present to it so that we can carry its lessons with us into life. Inititations heighten experience. So radical presence is a commitment to owning the shit as much as I would the gold, as they’re both of equal value to an alchemist. And radical presence is the alchemy that transmutes experience into aliveness. Radical aliveness, if you will. So back to the centre I return to recommence the task of claiming the aliveness that is my birthright.

As it happens, a few days ago I completed my death plan as part of my travel preparations and requested that Iggy Pop’s Lust for Life be one of the songs played at my funeral. I hope that when I die I’ve earned the right to have that track played.